19
Aug
11

India Gets Serious About Inflation

Demand is a funny creature. A healthy dose of it keeps the gears of the economy rolling smooth. Too much of it, drives up the cost of goods and services and can grind the wheels to a halt. Not enough demand and the same thing happens. Moderation is the key. It’s hard enough moderating your own personal vices yet alone those 1.2 billion people, in the world’s second most populous country. Despite the difficulties that come with managing that moderation, India is tackling the problem with a new round of planned investments in its port to the tune of US$60 billion dollars.

The Social Network

A Trillion is Cool!

In a line made famous by the movie based on Facebook, one of the lead characters told the young founder that a million isn’t cool. A billion is cool. If that’s true then the planned investment in Indian ports and other transportation outlets well surpasses that.

The $60 billion dollar investment in the ports is part of Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s planned $1 trillion revamp of choked transport and power networks to achieve faster expansion.

The initiative must transcend a history of insufficient investment, which has left the world’s most populous democracy trailing a Chinese economy now more than three times larger.

“If there isn’t enough capacity, you lose time and it adds to cost,” said Leif Eskesen, an economist at HSBC Holdings Plc.

Companies Want Action

Thermax’s, a power equipment manufacturer, managing director M. S. Unnikrishnan says “It takes 45 days transportation for incoming cargo for me and similar time when I send it to my customers overseas.” He was also quoted as saying,  “The Chinese can possibly do it in seven days.”

This adds costs and reduces efficiency and India is taking action. The Indian government is relying partly on investment by companies such as DP World Ltd. and AP Moller-Maersk to lift capability at ports to 3.1 billion tonne by 2020 from 963 million tonne in 2010.

After implementation of the building this will enable greater imports of consumer good like, electronics, raw materials, and oil, which in turn dampens inflation by better feeding consumer demand. India has 13 major ports overseen by the central government and 187 smaller harbors that account for 90% of exports by volume. India imports more than it exports and thus had a trade deficit of almost $105 billion in the last fiscal year.

They Keep Coming

At 1.2 billion people and growing, India is the second most populous country in the world and that figure is only getting bigger. They are projected to capture the title of most populous, overtaking China by 2025. In reality, that’s not that far into the future and arrives just after the total of the ports investment money will be put into action by 2020. Perfect timing.

In the meantime, Pacific Tycoon is here to help you wade through the waters of container ownership and leasing that puts your money to work by leasing your containers to the world’s largest companies that are shipping to India, China and other fast growing economies in Asia. With the world financial markets and developed countries are suffering due to mismanaged debt, demand is Asia is pumping money into the hands of our container owners. Contact us and let us show you how easy a direct investment into the Asian economies can be.

Image: TheSocialNetwork

Source: HellenicShipping, Wikipedia

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